Swedish Wildlife

Swedish Wildlife

Sweden's Big Five

Brown Bear

Brown Bear

Sweden's largest predator, the brown bear, can weigh up to 350kg. It eats mainly berries, ants and shrubs, but may also hunt voles and salmon. The brown bear hibernates during the winter, and cubs are born every two or three years. Sweden has around 2500 bears in the wild. Read more about Brown Bears in Sweden ».

Wolverine

Wolverine

The wolverine is the largest of the mustelids (a group of animals which includes the badger and the otter), and can weigh up to 30kg. In summer the wolverine feeds mainly on birds and mammals, but in winter will eat reindeer killed either by itself or other predators. Protected in Sweden since 1969, the wolverine is still rare in Sweden, with around 450 wild individuals, and it is still one of Sweden's most threatened species. You may spot the tracks of this shy predator on our Discover Wilderness Canoeing in Rogen experience in the beautiful Rogen reserve in north-east Sweden. Read more about Wolverines in Sweden ».

Wolf

Wolf

The wolf is a social animal, with packs consisting of 10-15 wolves. All the wolves in a pack will be related, e.g. two parents and offspring. During summer, wolves hunt by themselves or in pairs, while in autumn and winter they hunt together in packs to be able to target bigger animals like the elk. The population of wild wolves in Sweden is around 130 individuals. Nature Travels offers you the chance to track and howl with a wolf pack on our Howling with Wolves experience. Read more about Wolves in Sweden ».

Golden Eagle

Golden Eagle

One of the largest birds of prey, the golden eagle has broad wings and a longish tail and a different outline from the buzzard, which is smaller. It loves to glide on air currents, holding its wings in a shallow V. Golden eagles have nesting places and territories which may by used for generations. Read more about Golden Eagles in Sweden ».

Lynx

Lynx

Sweden's only feline, the lynx weighs 15-30kg, with males being larger than females. The lynx is a skilful hunter, catching hare, wildfowl and voles, as well as larger animals such as roe-deer and reindeer. It mates in March, with young being born in May. In Sweden the lynx has been protected since 1991, and the wild population is now around 1300. Read more about Lynx in Sweden ».

Other Swedish Wildlife

Elk

Elk (or moose!)

Sweden's largest mammal, the male elk can weigh up to 700kg. It has brown to greyish-black, with greyish-white legs. This makes the elk hard to see sometimes in the forests. Elks in Sweden number around 210,000. The Latin name, Alces alces, is known as a "moose" in North America and an "elk" in Sweden. But in North America, an "elk" is a deer-like animal otherwise known as a "Wapiti"! Read more about Moose in Sweden ».

Beaver

Beaver

The beaver became extinct in Sweden in the late 19th century, but was reintroduced from Norway in 1922. Since then it has thrived and populations in Värmland alone number several thousand. It can be up to three feet long not including the tail and weigh up to 65 pounds. Our Timber Rafting on Klarälven and Canoe on Svartälven experiences give you good chances of spotting this fascinating natural engineer. Read more about Beavers in Sweden ».

Arctic Fox

Arctic Fox

Arctic foxes do not hibernate and can withstand temperatures of -50 deg C. They are pure white in winter and generally greyish-brown in summer. They may be over a metre long including the tail and weigh up to 8kg. Although they are omnivores, they prefer small mammals such as lemmings, eggs, carrion and berries. Critically endangered with a European mainland population of only around 150, important populations of Arctic foxes inhabit Vindelfjällen Nature Reserve, the setting for our horse riding experiences in northern Sweden. Read more about Arctic Foxes in Sweden ».

Sea Eagle

Sea Eagle

The Sea Eagle, or White-Tailed Eagle, is the largest bird of prey in northern Europe. After many years of deternmined conservation effort, it is now well and truly back from the brink of extinction. Sweden now has around 350 breeding pairs with around 900 young individuals. There are a number of Sea Eagles inhabiting the eastern archipelago and may be seen on our Sea Kayaking in the Stockholm Archipelago and Sea Kayaking in St Anna Archipelago experiences. Read more about Sea Eagles in Sweden ».

Grey Seal

Grey Seal

The grey seal is the largest of the seal species of Sweden, and may be up to three metres long and weigh up to 300kg. The grey seal will eat many kinds of fish, and while it lives in the sea can survive for long periods on land. One pup is born on an ice floe in February. The population in the Baltic numbers around 6,000. Grey seals inhabit the outer areas of the Stockholm Archipelago.

Capercaillie

Capercaillie

The capercaillie is a huge woodland grouse which spends much of its time ground feeding but may also feed on shoots in trees. The large black Capercaillie males are unmistakable.

Roe Deer

Roe Deer

The Roe Deer is Sweden's most common deer, seldom weighing over 35kg. Sweden has a population of around a million. In the south and middle of the country the roe deer is common but rarer further north. Red deer and Fallow deer also occur in Sweden but have more scattered populations.

Black Grouse

Black Grouse

The males of the black grouse are all black and have a distinctive red wattle over the eye and white stripe along each wing in flight. They have a lyre-shaped tail which is fanned out and raised during display revealing white under-tail feathers. The females are smaller and grey-brown with a slightly notched tail.

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